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Key Facts & Figures

0.7%

Covering just 0.7% of Europe's total land with photovoltaic modules would be enough to provide 100% of the continent's electricity needs.

Photovoltaics can play a much bigger role in providing Europe with clean and affordable electricity.

Source: EPIA, Photovoltaic Energy - Electricity from the Sun, 2010

 

95%

Photovoltaic systems produce net clean electricity for more than 95% of their lifetime.

The technical lifetime of photovoltaic systems is 30+ years. Depending on the type of system and its location, photovoltaic systems recover the energy used in producing them in between 6 months and 1.4 years.

Source: EPIA Sustainable Development Working Group and M. Held, R.Ilg, Update of environmental indicators and energy payback time of CdTe PV systems in Europe, Progr. Photovolt: Res. Appl., 2011.

 

15%

Photovoltaics has the potential to meet up to 15% of the EU electricity demand by 2030.

Based on current market trends, photovoltaics could meet 7% of the EU electricity demand in 2020 and up to 15% in 2030.

Source: EPIA, Global Market Outlook for Photovoltaics 2014-2018, 2014 

 

RECYCLED

Photovoltaic modules can be recycled and the materials can be reused.

This is beneficial to the environment and also contributes to reducing the production cost. More information on the European initiative PV CYCLE at www.pvcycle.org.

 

LET’S TALK

Policy measures should aim at creating a continuum among all players of the electricity sector.

Solar photovoltaics has the potential to provide 15% of the electricity demand in Europe by 2030, and up to 25% under certain conditions. Such cooperation among electricity players would enable them to unlock the potential of photovoltaics and to address complex issues together, improve coordination in investment planning, better use photovoltaics’ capability to participate in system operation, foster harmonised national connection rules, unlock the potential of aggregation and identify the right functionalities for smart-meters.

Source: EPIA, Connecting the Sun: Solar photovoltaics on the road to large-scale grid integration, 2012

 

CHEAPER

As the price of photovoltaic modules decreases, so does the cost of generating electricity from photovoltaics. Solar power is already cheaper than you think.

The price trend for photovoltaic technology will continue to make it increasingly cost competitive against conventional electricity sources, even when taking into account the costs of grid enhancements needed to accommodate a more diversified, variable and electricity-intensive energy mix.

Source: EPIA, Connecting the Sun: Solar photovoltaics on the road to large-scale grid integration, 2012

 

FREE

The fuel is free.

The sun is the only resource needed to power a solar photovoltaic system. And the sun will keep shining.

Source: EPIA, Photovoltaic Energy - Electricity from the Sun, 2010

 

NEARLY 140 GW

In 2012, the 100 gigawatts (GW) mark was reached and by 2013, nearly 140 GW of photovoltaics had been installed globally – an amount capable of producing at least 160 terrawatt hours (TWh) of electricity every year.

This energy volume is sufficient to cover the annual power supply needs of over 45 million European households. This is also the equivalent of the electricity produced by 32 large coal power plants.

Source: EPIA, Global Market Outlook for Photovoltaics 2014-2018, 2014 

 

ALMOST 40 GW

2013 was another historic year for solar photovoltaic technology with almost 40 gigawatts (GW) of newly-installed solar photovoltaic capacity worldwide.

Compared to the two previous years, where installed capacity hovered slightly above 30 GW annually, the photovoltaic market progressed remarkably in 2013.

Source: EPIA, Global Market Outlook for Photovoltaics 2014-2018, 2014

 

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Photovoltaic Energy - Electricity from the Sun

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